Brownstone » Articles for Josh Stevenson

Josh Stevenson

Josh lives in Nashville Tennessee and is a data visualization expert who focuses on creating easy to understand charts and dashboards with data. Throughout the pandemic, he has provided analysis to support local advocacy groups for in-person learning and other rational, data-driven covid policies. His background is in computer systems engineering & consulting, and his Bachelor’s degree is in Audio Engineering. His work can be found on his substack “Relevant Data.”

Early Warnings of Non-Covid Mortality

Already in 2020, There Were Signs of Increased Non-Covid Mortality

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Second-order effects on mortality were not measured in real time like SARS-COV2 cases. Why? What we measure matters. What we don’t measure might actually just matter even more. Months and years later we are still accounting for how the Covid-19 response disrupted life and cost lives in many other ways we simply chose to ignore.


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The Myth of the Disease-Ridden Red States

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The entire proposition is just silly. The concept of innate differences in populations is a well established consideration for those who study population health. One might think that our nations most prestigious newspaper might require their top writer to consult with population health experts or even an actuarial scientist in order to obtain a more informed perspective and give the data more rigorous analysis.


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The Monkeypox Outbreak of 2003

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Is this how every rare and exotic new pathogenic threat is going to be treated, now that we’ve got everyone’s attention for 2 years of social/political/economic upheaval? 


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Mask Studies

The Mask Studies You Should Know

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As we finally move past this massive psychological experiment, we should address the secondary effects that masks have had on our society, especially our children, and one day actually insist that our government and public health leaders commit to risk/benefit analysis instead of blindly following the urge to “do something.”


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Contra CDC, School Masking Did Not Keep Kids In School

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One of the reasons we were told masks were essential for school kids this year was that masks would reduce the likelihood of school closures, by reducing disease incidence. Unfortunately, like so much the CDC has promised, the opposite turns out to be true.


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